Jump to Content

Melvyl FAQ

          Overview

  1. Why are there 11 different versions of Melvyl?
  2. Will Melvyl take the place of my campus library catalog?
  3. What can I find in Melvyl?
  4. What can’t I find in Melvyl?
  5. Can I use Melvyl to find items on reserve for my class?
  6. If I’d like to make a comment or point out an error, what do I need to do?
  7. Why does Melvyl default to Libraries Worldwide instead of to the University of California Libraries?
  8. Searching

  9. Where can I find help on navigating Melvyl?
  10. Why does one record seem to “hide” a lot of records behind it?
  11. Why does it sometimes say a book is at my campus library, but when the record comes up, it appears at another library?
  12. Where is the call number for the resource I want?
  13. How do I do a "Title begins with..." search in the Basic Search box?
  14. How do I use facets?
  15. How do I know what’s in my campus library?
  16. Sometimes I see a really old edition of a work coming up when I know there’s a new edition. Why does that happen?
  17. How do materials in SRLF and NRLF display in Melvyl?
  18. I just want to find a book.
  19. What does the "View Now" link do?
  20. Why do I get an "authentication needed" message?
  21. HathiTrust

  22. I know there are HathiTrust items in Melvyl, but where are they?
  23. I’m frustrated by finding links to what I think will be full text in HathiTrust. Why do we have these links when they don’t go to the full text of an item?
  24. How can I get to the items that are NOT available in full text in HathiTrust?
  25. I found an ebook ("Catalogue of Greek coins") in UCLA's Melvyl, but there aren't any UCLA links under the 'online copy' section. Is this ebook available at UCLA?
  26. A book from UCLA’s collection has a scan in HathiTrust. Shouldn’t a HathiTrust link appear somewhere in our catalog record? The book is Christabel and the lyrical and imaginative poems of S.T. Coleridge (OCLC No. 5856922).
  27. Other Services / Topics

  28. Can I use Request (Interlibrary Loan/Document Delivery) in Melvyl?
  29. Who can use Request?
  30. I used to be able to sign in to my profile when using Request. Is there a way I can save my library card information between sessions?
  31. How do I request more than one item at a time?
  32. What is a WorldCat user account and why would I want one?
  33. How do I email records?
  34. For email, why I can't put in my own subject line and then a message that makes sense to the receiver of the message?
  35. I'd like the ability to format a record for printing with the bibliographic information and call number.
  36. It appears that I have to select items in my search results and save them PAGE BY PAGE and that I can't seem to a) do a search b) review results over several pages, selecting interesting items c) add all selected items to a list. Am I doing something wrong?
  37. How do I export citations into EndNote or RefWorks?
  38. I’d like to scroll through records using Next and Previous buttons.
  39. Why do the Center for Research Libraries records display in Melvyl under UC Libraries?

Overview

  1. Why are there 11 different versions of Melvyl?
  2. The UC libraries were charged with making a replacement for the previous version of Melvyl on the WorldCat Local (WCL) platform. For the central version, Melvyl represents the union catalog of the University of California Libraries, so users can go there to see if the UC libraries own an item without preferencing any UC library or needing to know the names of UC campuses. In the central version, all campuses and materials in the RLFs (NRLF and SRLF) are represented equally. Interlibrary Loan (Request) also has to have a UC Libraries database in order to make consortial borrowing work.

    Having campus versions of Melvyl allows a campus user to limit to the holdings of that campus as well as to see items held by the University of California Libraries or Libraries Worldwide. In addition, local notes added by the campus and uploaded to OCLC are visible only in that campus version of Melvyl.

  3. Will Melvyl take the place of my campus library catalog?
  4. Melvyl was designed to replace the union catalog. All of the ongoing staffing, maintenance, and operations were designed to support the union catalog rather than campus catalogs. If a campus wishes to replace its catalog with its campus Melvyl instance, the campus would need to discuss options for customization and coordination with the union catalog. Depending on the level of control desired, there may be additional costs and staffing required; discussions between the campus, CDL and OCLC would be needed to decide on the best strategy.

  5. What can I find in Melvyl?
    • Resources that are fully cataloged in the UC campus (main) catalogs, including books, journals, media, government publications, maps, electronic databases, and more.
    • Selected records for books on order or in the process of being added to the collection.
    • Records for the Southern & Northern Regional Library Facilities (SRLF & NRLF), the Mass Digitization Projects (digitized Google and other books), and from sample campus digital collections, eScholarship, as well as digital content from the Online Archive of California (OAC).
    • Resources in libraries around the world, listed from a service called WorldCat.org, including many California research libraries: California State Library, Hastings College of the Law, the California Academy of Sciences, the California Historical Society, the Center for Research Libraries, the Graduate Theological Union, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and some campus affiliated libraries. Many of the records for these collections are found in Level 3 in Melvyl (Worldwide Libraries).
    • Selected full-text articles are available via Melvyl. Citations for articles indexed in British Library Serials; Elsevier; ERIC (education); JSTOR (a wide range of subjects); MEDLINE (medicine and health); GPO (U.S. government publications); and ArticleFirst (articles from a wide range of journals in all subjects) are available. Beginning in 2012, articles indexed in multiple vendor databases (known cumulatively as the Central Index; see Advanced Search for a list of databases) are available in search results.
    • The service also contains feature cover art, tables of contents, author notes, excerpts and related links with enriched record data.
    • An Ask a Librarian feature is also built into the interface.

  6. What can’t I find in Melvyl?
  7. There may be some brief records that appear only in a campus catalog, and have not yet been added to Melvyl. If you cannot find something you think should be in Melvyl, check your campus local catalog, or for the storage facilities, check http://oskicat.berkeley.edu for NRLF or http://catalog.libary.ucla.edu for SRLF.

  8. Can I use Melvyl to find items on reserve for my class?
  9. No. In order to find books or other material placed on Reserves for a class you need to search your campus catalog. This feature may be added in the future.

  10. If I’d like to make a comment or point out an error, what do I need to do?
  11. At the bottom of any of the Melvyl screens, click on the WorldCat: Feedback link and fill in your comments/corrections. All comments that are submitted in all versions of Melvyl come to the UC California Digital Library for response. Requests for bug fixes, further information or explanation are submitted separately to OCLC.

  12. Why does Melvyl default to Libraries Worldwide instead of to the University of California Libraries?
  13. Using Melvyl supported by WorldCat Local moves discovery beyond the local level to the network level. While limiting the scope of discovery to local catalogs made sense in the analog library in order to meet timely delivery expectations, this technique makes less sense in the digital library environment, where the delivery of information to users depends less on a user’s location than on her credentials.

    Using WorldCat Local gives us the opportunity to take discovery out of the single library, UC union, or regional consortium “silo” environments and place it at the international network level, the level known to be where most information searches now begin, for example. This allows our users to expand discovery beyond the resources available within our own consortium (which are considerable, yet limited on a world-scale) while at the same time giving them the ability to seamlessly scope down to the local level, be it at the single library level, the UC-wide level, or the regional level, when it makes sense.


    Searching

  14. Where can I find help on navigating Melvyl?
  15. Why does one record seem to “hide” a lot of records behind it?
  16. This is called the FRBRization (FRBR is pronounced 'ferber') of records. (FRBR stands for Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records.) The purpose of using FRBR in a database that contains hundreds of millions of records is to simplify the display of titles in multiple formats so that information seekers don't wade through different records for versions of a popular title, such as the movie, the audiobook or translations. Varied expressions of a source work are collapsed in a single record display.

    To view all versions of an item, click on the View all formats and languages >> link on the search results page or on the View all editions and formats link on the detailed record. You will be able to further sort your records at that point.

  17. Why does it sometimes say a book is at my campus library, but when the record comes up, it appears at another library?
  18. This is a result of FRBRization. Click on the View all formats and languages >> link on the search results page or on the View all editions and formats link on the detailed record and you will most likely see a copy at your library.

  19. Where is the call number for the resource I want?
  20. For all items, the call number can be found on the Item Details (full record) page, once you click on the item you’re seeking. For books, the location, status, call number and notes display directly. See below.

    However, for print journals and articles in print journals only holdings and notes summaries (no call numbers) display at this level. See below.

    Click the View item details link, to display the more specific shelving locations, holdings, call numbers, and notes (below).

  21. How do I do a "Title begins with..." search in the Basic Search box?
  22. In the Basic Search box, enter ti=(title) and click the Search button. For example, a keyword seach for "Blink" retrieves 22,842 items. A ti=blink search retrieves only 302 items.

  23. How do I use facets?
  24. You can use the facets on the left hand side of the screen to limit search results, once you’ve conducted a search. You can also decide what facets you want to choose or deselect. For example, when you click on the Book facet, all book formats will be searched, such as ebooks, microforms, and theses. If you do not want to include these in your search, click in the boxes to deselect any formats.

  25. How do I know what’s in my campus library?
  26. Use the dropdown menu under the search box to limit to your campus library, the University of California Libraries, or Libraries Worldwide.

  27. Sometimes I see a really old edition of a work coming up when I know there’s a new edition. Why does that happen?
  28. Works are ranked by relevance so that when many libraries own a copy of a work, it appears first. As a result, older editions held by many libraries may appear in a results list rather than a newer edition with fewer holdings. You can see more recent editions by clicking on the View all formats and languages >> link on the search results page or on the View all editions and formats link on the detailed record.

  29. How do materials in SRLF and NRLF display in Melvyl?
  30. SRLF holdings appear in Level 1 (campus-specific) for the owning campus AND in Level 1 for UCLA (since the SRLF is listed under UCLA and this is the holding location). For all other campuses, the holdings appear in Level 2 (UC-systemwide).

    NRLF holdings appear in Level 1 (campus-specific) for the owning campus AND in Level 1 for UCB (since the NRLF is listed under UCB and this is the holding location). For all other campuses, the holdings appear in Level 2 (UC-systemwide).

    Having multiple OCLC symbols on a title that has been deposited in an RLF shows the display of both who owns a volume and where it is physically located. It also allows us to route ILL traffic in the manner we want by setting deflection on one of the symbols. This method is also beneficial if we want tools like WorldCat Collection Analysis to help show overlaps in collections, e.g. “How many things of ours do we have in remote storage?”

  31. I just want to find a book.
  32. There are a few strategies you can use when searching for books.

    1. If you know the exact title of the book, search for it using the index ti= for title, followed by an equal sign (which designates an anchored search).
      For example: ti=Blink : the power of thinking without thinking
    2. When the title appears, use the facets on the left side of the screen to limit to Format Book, and if necessary, do further limitations.
    3. If there are several editions of a book, you may need to click on the View all formats and languages >> link on the search results page or on the View all editions and formats link on the detailed record to find the one you want.
    4. If you know the publication year of a desired edition, you can enter your search like this:
      Samuelson economics 1992
      Or, to be more precise: au:samuelson ti:economics yr:1992

  33. What does the "View Now" link do?
  34. View Now links appear for freely available full text content in Melvyl. When an item such as a HathiTrust full text book is available, you will see an active "View Now" link on the search results page, without needing to go to the detailed record.

    view now

    After you click the View Now link, a second link appears leading to the full text of the item.

    In addition to HathiTrust materials, the View Now links appear for free resources in the following categories: .gov/.edu for government and educational documents and Internet Archive and Project Gutenberg items for full text works.

  35. Why do I get an "authentication needed" message?

    Melvyl can now search selected licensed vendor databases which the University of California Libraries license on behalf of UC students, faculty and staff. In order to search these databases, you will need either to be on campus or use your campus's off-campus access mechanism. You can still search freely available databases, including University of California held books and journals, by clicking the "ENTER AS GUEST..." link.

    University of California Libraries authentication needed

    You may encounter this message on campus or through an off-campus access mechanism if you are using a Melvyl version different from your campus version. For example, if you are at the UC Davis campus and use the UCLA Melvyl version you will encounter this message. For best results, use your campus's Melvyl instance.


  36.              

    HathiTrust

  37. I know there are HathiTrust items in Melvyl, but where are they?
  38. In general, you can find this information on the Item Details (full record) display in the “Links to this item” section. When you click the Show all links from other libraries link, you will find the link to the HathiTrust Digital Library, and possibly other resources. Click the link to go to HathiTrust.

    Additionally, for items in the public domain where the full text is available online, a “View Now” link displays on the search results screen. Clicking the “View Now” link displays the link to the full text of the item. See below.

  39. I’m frustrated by finding links to what I think will be full text in HathiTrust. Why do we have these links when they don’t go to the full text of an item?
  40. Labels for HathiTrust items indicate if the full text of the item is available online. Those books not in the public domain (around 7,000,000), are labeled HathiTrust Digital Library Limited view (search only). See below.

    With this message, users know that the entire full text is not accessible, but that the text is available for searching for words or phrases.

    Users determine if any of the 3,000,000 HathiTrust items in the public domain are available in full text by the presence of the “View Now” link on the results screen. Clicking the “View Now” link displays the link to the full text of the item. For public domain works in HathiTrust, a label displays on the results and item level screens: HathiTrust Digital Library Full View.

  41. How can I get to the items that are NOT available in full text in HathiTrust?
  42. When the full text is not available from HathiTrust because of copyright restrictions and if the print version is not available on your campus, you should return to the Melvyl record and use the Request button to borrow the item through interlibrary loan.

  43. I found an ebook ("Catalogue of Greek coins") in UCLA's Melvyl, but there aren't any UCLA links under the 'online copy' section. Is this ebook available at UCLA?
  44. When viewing items on a local catalog version (e.g., Melvyl UCLA Library), Melvyl automatically loads the circulation data that appears in the UCLA catalog record in the top section of the Item Details (full record) display. Since UCLA's holdings appear at the top section of the record, UCLA is not listed in the University of California Libraries' section.

    In this case, UCLA does not have any data that Melvyl can interpret so it only displays the message, "No Links were found." This is because this is an electronic item and no call number information appears in UCLA's local record.


    No UCLA links display

    This record is for the HathiTrust Digital Library ebook. The HathiTrust Digital Library link is located under "Other libraries".


    Click the "Show all links from other libraries" link...
                 
    ...to display the HathiTrust Digital Library link

    We're working with OCLC to improve the display of the HathiTrust Digital Library links so that they are more visible. Until then, you should always check the "Other libraries" section to see if a link to the HathiTrust Digital Library is in place. This link usually accounts for why a record has been labeled as an ebook record. Also, all of the HathiTrust links can be found under the Show all links from other libraries link whether they are available in full text or not.

    If you click the View all editions and formats link at the top of the record, you'll see other records for UC holdings.

    The ebook format is the record you found. All the campuses display because the campus holdings symbols have been attached to the HathiTrust Digital Library record. Additionally, any campuses that hold physical copies of the book also show the physical locations.

  45. A book from UCLA’s collection has a scan in HathiTrust. Shouldn’t a HathiTrust link appear somewhere in our catalog record? The book is Christabel and the lyrical and imaginative poems of S.T. Coleridge (OCLC No. 5856922).
  46. All HathiTrust items have separate ebook records in Melvyl (WorldCat Local); the HathiTrust links do not appear on the records of corresponding print versions.

    You can find the ebook record by clicking the View all editions and formats link in the title section of the print book record. See below.

    Select the ebook record.

    Additionally, you can find the ebook record by selecting the eBook checkbox under the Format section of the sidebar on the Search Results screen.


                 

    Other Services / Topics

  47. Can I use Request (Interlibrary Loan/Document Delivery) in Melvyl?
  48. Yes, you can access the Request service through the yellow/orange Request button or by clicking the UC-eLinks button and then clicking the Request option on the UC-eLinks menu. "Request" allows you to either submit a document delivery request (if available on your campus) or to request the item from another institution (Interlibrary Loan). You don't need to worry where it is, Request automatically locates potential lenders. You can find more information in Request Help.

  49. Who can use Request?
  50. University of California faculty, staff, and students may use Request. UC alumni and users from other institutions wishing to obtain UC materials via Interlibrary Loan must initiate Interlibrary Loan requests from their local public libraries, their corporate libraries, or for those currently enrolled/employed at another academic institution, their current campus libraries.

  51. I used to be able to sign in to my profile when using Request. Is there a way I can save my library card information between sessions?
  52. Melvyl Profiles are not available due to a limitation of the WorldCat Local platform. At the present time, there are no plans to provide this feature in WCL Melvyl.

    You can use your web browser's Autofill feature to automatically fill in your Library Card/Account Number & email address. The Request service auto-detects your IP address and displays the appropriate Home campus form.

  53. How do I request more than one item at a time?
  54. Currently, you cannot request more than one item at a time in Melvyl or via UC-eLinks; the ability to request multiple items at the same time is only available in PubMed. Otherwise you must request items one by one.

    Single Items

    The Request button is available from the Item Details (full record) display of a Melvyl record. Click on the Request button to ask for items not available at your home campus or to ask for document delivery of items owned by your home campus if your library offers a document delivery service.

    You can also click on the "Request It" link on a UC-eLinks menu.

    Multiple Items

    If you are accessing PubMed from a UC library's link, PubMed's "Order" feature allows you to save multiple records and then submits the entire list to UC's Request service for processing. On PubMed, check the boxes next to the items you wish to request. Click the Send to: link, select the Order radio button, and then click the Order Articles button. A Citation List of the selected items displays. If an item is available electronically, you will see a hyperlink to the online version of the article. See below.

    online link

    Re-check the boxes next to any items that are not available electronically and then click the Request button to begin the request process.

  55. What is a WorldCat user account and why would I want one?
  56. A WorldCat user account allows you to create a personal profile; build private and public lists of library items; and contribute reviews and notes to WorldCat records. Additionally, some features like emailing or exporting multiple records can only be done from a saved list (WorldCat account required).

  57. How do I email records?
  58. You can email individual items by clicking the Email button at the top of the Item Details (full record) screen.

  59. For email, why I can't put in my own subject line and then a message that makes sense to the receiver of the message?
  60. OCLC is not planning to add any new customizations to this feature, such as the ability for patrons to enter in their own subject lines, anytime soon. According to OCLC, the more customization they provide for sending email, the more likely it is that a spammer will exploit the feature. It comes down to a balance between security and ease of use. Right now, OCLC is erring on the side of security.

  61. I'd like the ability to format a record for printing with the bibliographic information and call number.
  62. At the present time, the Print link on the Item Details screen simply prints a screen shot, which can include the call number if the campus location information is open on the screen.

    Alternately, copy the call number from the Item Details screen and then save the record to a list; sign in with your WorldCat account first. Go to My WorldCat/My Lists and select the record from the saved list. On the “Details and Notes View” tab, click the Edit Note button and paste in the call number for the item. Click Save Note. Finally, click the Print link at the top of the screen. The resulting printout will include basic information on the item (Title, Author, Format, etc.) along with the call number you saved in the Note field.

  63. It appears that I have to select items in my search results and save them PAGE BY PAGE and that I can't seem to a) do a search b) review results over several pages, selecting interesting items c) add all selected items to a list. Am I doing something wrong?
  64. In order to save multiple items into a list, first sign in with your WorldCat account. On the search results screen, check the boxes for the records you wish to save on the current screen. Create a [New List] or save to an existing list by selecting the list from the Save to dropdown menu at the top of the records display. Click the Save button to save these records into your selected list. Then, click the Next link to move onto the next screen of records and save any items you want from that screen before moving on.

    You can find more information on Saving Searches, Items, & Updates here: http://www.cdlib.org/services/d2d/melvyl/saving.html.

  65. How do I export citations into EndNote or RefWorks?
  66. You can find information on exporting records from Melvyl here: http://www.cdlib.org/services/info_services/instruct/Exporting_records_from_Melvyl.docx.

  67. I’d like to scroll through records using Next and Previous buttons.
  68. WorldCat Local does not currently support this functionality. However, OCLC plans to make this available in a future release.

  69. Why do the Center for Research Libraries records display in Melvyl under UC Libraries?
  70. Records for items held at the Center for Research Libraries (CRL), located in Chicago, display under Level 2 with the University of California Libraries holdings in Melvyl; see below.

    crl_display

    There are several reasons for this.

    1. Nine UC campus libraries are members of CRL. UC has a substantial investment in CRL and in making CRL’s rare, unique and little known items highly visible and available to our researchers.
    2. The UC libraries deposit collections to be stored and preserved at CRL for the use of researchers worldwide. We want these collections to be visible to our own researchers, too.
    3. At the time of the transition from the former version of Melvyl to WorldCat Local, a policy decision was made to include CRL’s records as part of UC because of our long and active relationship with CRL. The decision was endorsed by the public services and collection development committees.
    4. CRL records have displayed prominently in Melvyl as long as UC libraries have been members, and through pre-WorldCat Local versions of Melvyl. CRL records were added as a part of UC’s holdings in WorldCat Local in April of 2011. Trends in CRL usage by UC library users after that date show a marked increase in usage for requests, filled requests, and digital downloads.

    So when you see Center for Research Libraries displaying under University of California Libraries, it is intentional, for your convenience, and not an error.


    Especially for Librarians

    1. Why does my campus display as holding an item but it does not and the message at the top of the record says “No Links were found”?
    2. How can I give feedback about...
    3. When will Special Collections/Local Data be available in the campus catalogs?
    4. Do records for collection guides and digitized items in OAC/Calisphere appear in Melvyl?
    5. What workaround do you suggest since OCLC doesn't provide a MARC display?
    6. When I can’t find detailed enough information in Melvyl, what other tool can I use?
    7. There should be a browse capability for author names, titles, journal titles, and subjects. Please keep working to provide this.
    8. When I click the UC-eLinks button on a record in the ERIC database, the resulting Melvyl search shows no UC holdings. However, when I click on the Worldwide Library record, there is a URL to the document. Why doesn't UC show a link to the document?
    9. What criteria is used to determine what links appear for View Now?
    10. Where does the link for View Now come from?
    11. How is the label for the View Now link determined?
    12. Why do search results in Central Index databases differ from the results in the "native" versions?
    13. How does OCLC make decisions as to how to improve its interface, and what features to include or change?

    1. Why does my campus display as holding an item but it does not and the message at the top of the record says “No Links were found”?
    2. If UC has contributed the item to the HathiTrust Digital Library, the UC MASS DIGITIZATION holdings symbol (CDLER) is attached to the record. Since the CDLER holdings symbol represents all of the UC campuses, in WCL, a record containing the CDLER symbol will display links for all 10 campuses. This makes it look like each UC campus holds the item.

      seems like UCLA holds
      Seems like UCLA holds this ebook
                    ucla_online

      But no UCLA links display

      One way to verify if this is the case is to click the Other libraries link under the Find a copy online section to see if the HathiTrust Digital Library link is there. If so, this is why your campus is included on the record even though it does not hold a physical copy of the item.

      other libraries

      Click the "Other libraries" link...

                    hathitrust link
      ...to display the HathiTrust Digital Library link

      We agree that the “No links…” message is confusing to users and we are continuing to work with OCLC to find a better way to present the HathiTrust Digital Library links.

    3. How can I give feedback about...
      1. ...interface issues, training issues, functionality?
      2. All comments that are submitted via the Feedback link in all versions of Melvyl come to the California Digital Library (CDL) for response. Requests for bug fixes, further information or explanation are submitted separately to OCLC. OCLC makes many of its enhancements based on usability testing it conducts. See http://www.oclc.org/usability-testing/services-evaulated.en.html for more information.

      3. ...technical, configuration, and customization issues?
      4. For technical questions, configuration and customization requests, use MelvylOps [at] cdlib [dot] org. Your question will go into our ticketing system and are viewed by the whole technical team.

    4. When will Special Collections/Local Data be available in the campus catalogs?
    5. OCLC currently has a project underway to add the capability to store local data attached to WorldCat master records in order to:

      1. Load, search and display local data, including but not limited to local subject headings, uniform titles, notes, etc.
      2. Load local system number to use as the unique identifier between WorldCat Local and your ILS/LMS to retrieve real time item availability.

      Campus libraries are not required to load their local data, and there is no particular timeline involved. If your campus wishes to take advantage of expanded access to your library’s local data, libraries need to first add this content to WorldCat via a batchload reclamation project. The batchload order form in the Online Service Center now accepts the addition of local data to your existing batchload project. You may add your local data via a one-time batchload at no charge. In the batchload order, tell OCLC you want to access your local data through WorldCat Local.

      Note: The document below uses the term “local holdings record data” to mean “local data”. Local data includes but is not limited to local subject headings, uniform titles, notes, etc. When it is available for search and display, your campus library’s local data will be limited to use in your version of Melvyl, e.g., UCLA Melvyl. Other Melvyl and WCL sites will not have access to your local data.

      This should not be confused with Local Holdings Records (LHRs). LHRs are used for maintaining accurate current holding information and to share detailed holdings information with library staff, users, and other libraries.

      Description of this project [PDF]

    6. Do records for collection guides and digitized items in OAC/Calisphere appear in Melvyl?
    7. Collection guides:

      The Online Archive of California contains over 20,000 “collection guides,” or finding aids, to archival collections throughout the State of California. Melvyl displays brief records for many — but not all — of these collections, with links back to the full guides on the OAC.

      If you are an OAC contributor and you would like more information on how to expose your finding aids through Melvyl (and OCLC’s ArchiveGrid service), contact us at oacops@ucop.edu.

      Digitized items:

      OAC and Calisphere contain approximately 220,000 digitized items from archival collections -- including photographs, documents, works of art, oral histories, and other primary sources. Currently Melvyl contains records for many — but not all — of these digitized items, with links back to the items in Calisphere.

      Unfortunately, there may be duplicates among these records, and some of them may contain inaccurate metadata. The CDL is working with OCLC to clean up these records in the near future.

    8. What workaround do you suggest since OCLC doesn't provide a MARC display?
    9. Because the WorldCat Local interface was designed as a tool for end-users, a MARC record display is not included. Some options for locating a MARC record display include:

      1. Your campus library catalog,
      2. The Library of Congress Catalog (http://catalog.loc.gov/),
      3. The cataloging department at your campus probably has an OCLC Connexion (OCLC's suite of cataloging tools and services) account. Catalogers at your campus may also be able to answer your MARC-related questions.

      Additionally, because the Shared Cataloging Program (SCP) is housed at UCSD, you'll find that ROGER - The UC San Diego Libraries Catalog (http://roger.ucsd.edu/) provides an excellent MARC record display of the systemwide-licensed resources.

      A MARC display is expected for the FirstSearch/WorldCat Local merge, scheduled in 2014. The MARC record displayed will be for the master record in WCL. The master record is a version of the WorldCat bibliographic record or an LC Authority File record available to all OCLC catalogers. A master record does not include local data for any library.

    10. When I can’t find detailed enough information in Melvyl, what other tool can I use?
    11. You can often use FirstSearch WorldCat (http://uclibs.org/PID/12633) to find specific information on an item. For example, in FirstSearch WorldCat you can…

      • Search for Previous/Successive Journal Titles (780/785 MARC fields): Click the Expert Search tab and enter ns:[ISSN] (use hyphen) in the input box and click the Search button. The information displays in the ‘Other Titles’, ‘Earlier Title’, ‘Later Title’ section(s) of the record. Note: You can also find this information using UlrichsWeb Global Serials Directory (http://uclibs.org/PID/5987).
      • Search by LC Call Number and multiple libraries: The LC call number is taken from the OCLC record and not the local owning library and searching libraries requires knowing the OCLC symbol. (Note: index deletes and collapses all spaces and punctuation, except periods.)

        On FirstSearch WorldCat, click the Expert Search tab and enter lc:[call number] in the input box. If you wanted to search for TA418.9* and add libraries CUV and CUY and you should get the titles owned by both UCD and UCB that have the books class starting ta418.9. The search would look like this, lc: ta418.9* and (li: cuy and li: cuv).

        If you wanted to confirm the results, on any record, scroll down to see the Class Descriptors section of the record. The LC Call Number will be highlighted. To verify the campuses in your search, click the Libraries worldwide that own item link at the top of the record. Then scroll to the ‘U’ section near the bottom of the holdings. Here you’ll see that not only do UCB (CUY) and UCD (CUV) hold this title, but UCI, UCLA, and UCSD do as well.

      • The OCLC symbols for the UC campuses are below.
        UC Berkeley -- CUY UC Riverside -- CRU
        UC Davis -- CUV UC San Diego -- CUS
        UC Irvine -- CUI UC San Francisco -- CUN
        UC Los Angeles -- CLU UC Santa Barbara -- CUT
        UC Merced -- MERUC UC Santa Cruz -- CUZ

      • Search by NAL (ag:) and NLM (lm:) Call Numbers: You can find information on searching for National Agricultural Library and National Library of Medicine Call Numbers in Index labels and examples of expert search in WorldCat.org and WorldCat Local.

    12. There should be a browse capability for author names, titles, journal titles, and subjects. Please keep working to provide this.

      Currently, Melvyl does not have a Browse feature. However, most of the campus OPACs have this ability. Additionally, you can browse in FirstSearch WorldCat (http://uclibs.org/PID/12633) or in the Library of Congress Catalog (http://catalog.loc.gov/).

      • In FirstSearch WorldCat/Advanced Search...
        1. Enter the search terms in the input box and select Author Phrase, Title Phrase, or Subject Phrase from the drop down menu.
        2. Click the 'Browse for' icon to the right of the dropdown menu (see below) to see the browse results.

        browse for icon

      • The Library of Congress Catalog/Basic Search includes an Author/Creator Browse, a Subject Browse, a Call Number Browse, an Author/Creator Browse Sorted by Title Browse, a Title Begins With search and a Number (LCCN-ISBN-ISSN) search. Enter the search terms in the input box, select the appropriate browse/search from the dropdown menu and click Begin Search.

    13. When I click the UC-eLinks button on a record in the ERIC database, the resulting Melvyl search shows no UC holdings. However, when I click on the Worldwide Library record, there is a URL to the document. Why doesn't UC show a link to the document?
    14. Although ERIC journal articles display accurately in Melvyl, records for ERIC documents do not; this is because of the way the documents were cataloged. Until anything changes we need to teach people these points:

      1. You can search directly by the ERIC Document number (if the cataloger has put it in the record). For example, you can enter ED518072 in the search box.
      2. It's often best NOT to limit to UC Libraries or the local library because of anomalies such as you point out. You can always scope down after the initial search.
      3. Whether an item looks like it is available at UC or not, it's worth a click to the full record because there are often links there that yield results for our users.

    15. What criteria are used to determine what links appear for View Now?
    16. View Now links will appear if the data from OCLC’s master record meets the following conditions (listed by category):

      (The following answers refer to MaRC fields. Explanations of MaRC fields are available at OCLC Bibliographic Formats and Standards page: http://www.oclc.org/bibformats/en/default.shtm.)

      .GOV/.EDU:

      • items with 856$u containing hdl.loc.gov that also have a 2nd indicator of null, zero or 1
      • items with 856$u containing '.gov/' or '.edu' and '.pdf' but not 'loc.gov' and that also have 2nd indicator of null, zero or 1
      • items that are ERIC records that have a URL in the 956$u
      • items with 'gpo.gov' in the 856 $u,that also have a 2nd indicator of null, zero, or 1

      HathiTrust full-text:

      • The link will be in the 856 field with first indicator coded 4, second indicator coded 0 with a subfield $u (URL) holding the full text link, including hathitrust.org, AND
      • [full-text-avail]Y[/full-text-avail] (from the HathiTrust CDF, not the master record)

      Archive.org / Gutenberg.org:

      • Links that contain 'www.archive.org' or 'gutenberg.org' in the 856 $u and that also have a 2nd indicator of null, zero, or 1

    17. Where does the link for View Now come from?
    18. The link for the View Now is from OCLC’s master record, the 856$u.

    19. How is the label for the View Now link determined?
    20. The label for the link (eg. “HathiTrust Digital Library”) comes from the 856$3 of OCLC’s master record. If the 856$3 is not present, the base URL from the 856$u is used.

    21. Why do search results in Central Index databases differ from the results in the "native" versions?
    22. As might be expected in a metasearch system of this kind, the databases that vendors provide to OCLC for loading into the Melvyl Central Index are not identical to those available through their "native" versions. There may be differences in dates covered, in journal titles covered, in what fields are included, and also in how fields are mapped for searching.

      For example, if abstracts aren't included (as with Academic Search Complete and Business Source Complete), or aren't mapped into the keyword search, results will very likely be less than in the "native" version. CDL has asked OCLC to provide documentation of what is and isn't being searched in the Central Index databases.

      For the most part, this feature is geared towards undergraduate researchers who are looking for a selection of relevant peer-reviewed articles, but who may not need to do deep and comprehensive research. In many cases the search capabilities of Central Index databases are much less refined than in the native interfaces.

      Note -- In many cases, if you select one database in Advanced Search you can choose from a more complete list of searchable fields (similar to the native interface) than the limited set of searchable fields (Author, Title, Keyword, Subject) available in multi-database searches. Bottom line: Advanced users will still need to use individual databases for the most complete and precise search results.

    23. How does OCLC make decisions as to how to improve its interface, and what features to include or change?
    24. OCLC has a usability testing program in which they use students, faculty and staff from academic libraries—including several at the University of California— to navigate tasks and discuss various aspects of the interface. Below is a summary of usability testing that Arnold Arcolio and OCLC staff have undertaken with partner libraries since WorldCat Local’s launch in 2007.

      • WorldCat Local Usability Assessments - Academic Libraries 2007-2011
        Arnold Arcolio, User Researcher, OCLC
      • This summary outlines the scope of eleven user studies of WorldCat Local conducted by OCLC User Experience and Design staff from 2007 to 2011. These studies are usually designed in cooperation with library partners. They are sometimes conducted in libraries with a moderator present and remote observers, sometimes conducted in student rooms or faculty offices with a remote moderator and observers, sometimes conducted in the OCLC Usability Lab in Dublin, Ohio, and sometimes conducted with automated tools and no live moderator. Tests conducted by a moderator have included 97 participants: 47 undergraduates, 36 graduate students, and 14 faculty. Automated tests have included 150 participants.

        This summary does not include several studies of the specialized HathiTrust WorldCat Local instance, studies of public library users of WorldCat local, or occasional lightweight formative studies conducted in the OCLC Usability Lab.

      • University of Washington, May, 2007
        Pilot Usability Evaluations
      • Assessment goals: Determine how successful University of Washington students are when using WorldCat Local to discover and obtain books and journal articles from the University of Washington collection, from the Summit consortium in which UW is a member, and from beyond, in both print and electronic forms.

        Issues to investigate included: How do participants use and react to the simple search box? Is the amount and content of description for bibliographic items what participants need or expect? Do participants succeed at obtaining paper and electronic items? Do participants find and succeed with the proxy server link for off-campus users? Does the need for participants to supply student IDs cause problems? Are the grouping and language of controls clear? How do participants use or react to the choices offered in the services row?

        Test participants: 7 college undergraduates, 3 graduate students

      • University of Washington, February, 2008
        Round Two of WorldCat Local Usability Testing
      • Assessment goals: Assess subject searching. Assess gathering editions with FRBR and showing one edition in search results to represent editions others of the same work.

        Issues to investigate included: What are student expectations for and responses to search result ranking? Are participants aware that items from the University of Washington are routinely gathered together at the top of search results? Is result ranking sufficient for exact matches when participants search with titles (one example of known item searching)? If exact matches are not at or near the top of the result list, do participants miss them, do they continue to scan the result, or do they compensate? Do participants choose to use facets in subject searches? If not, do they succeed without them? When participants choose to use facets in searching, are there obstacles in the way we present the facets? Are test participants able to find items with a specific format when they need them? Does edition-level detail on the search result page stop students from going on to the details page which shows different editions, in cases when they know they want a different edition from the one that stands for the work on the brief search result page? Do test participants get the latest edition of a work when they know they need the latest edition but don't know the year of that edition? Are electronic versions hidden when they are cataloged in a way that keeps them from joining other manifestations of the work? Are we showing the right level of detail on search result pages? Do we show the right edition in brief search results? Are participants confused by seeing more than one edition on search result pages in cases where FRBRization is incomplete?

        Test participants: 10 college undergraduates

      • University of California, Berkeley, University of California, Irvine, Spring, 2008
        WorldCat Local at the University of California: Usability Testing: Round One
      • Assessment goals: Assess how well a Next Generation Melvyl system based on OCLC’s WorldCat Local system meets the needs of UC scholars and advanced researchers using UC's system-wide collection; measure how successful these users are in performing common and critical tasks; discover and assess any barriers to adoption. Assess what users feel will be gained by a transition to WCL. Is this an improvement over current Melvyl? Discover what would improve WorldCat Local for users like these.

        Issues to investigate included: How do advanced researchers understand and act on local, group, and global collection scopes? How do advanced researchers examine and evaluate search results, including large set search results? What are their expectations about journal article content in this resource, and how do they use that content? Can test participants obtain electronic resources, given the range of fulfillment options? Do test participants understand how of edition and format relationships are displayed? How successful are test participants in discovery of known items? How successful are test participants in discovery of unknown items?

        Test participants: 6 graduate students, 8 faculty

      • The Ohio State University, April, 2008
        Contextual Interviews of Users: WorldCat Local Pilot
      • Assessment goals: Explore how academic users of WorldCat Local find, select, get, and track items for their research.

        Interview participants: 2 undergraduate students, 3 graduate students, 2 faculty

      • University of California Berkeley, December, 2008
        WorldCat Local: Item Details Page Designs
      • Assessment goals: Explore preliminary designs for revised WorldCat Local item details pages. Gather student views of social features.

        Issues to investigate included: How successful are participants with redesigned paths for access to electronic resources? With redesigned paths for access to physical library holdings at Berkeley or elsewhere in the UC system? How sufficient is the redesigned bibliographic information? How well do these designs support common scholarly tasks—identifying known items, selecting among unknown items, finding different editions or related items, and keeping track of items that had been found? What are student views of social features—ratings, reviews, tagging, list-making, and readers' recommendations?

        Test participants: 6 graduate students, 1 junior

      • University of Washington and University of California, Davis, March, 2009
        Federated Searching in WorldCat Local
      • Assessment goals: Evaluate designs for metasearch functionality in WorldCat Local still under development.

        Issues to investigate included: Can participants identify and select databases to search? Do participants understand the way results from various databases are integrated? Are they able to make the choices they need to make from the search results they see? What terminology do participants use for various kinds of digital content?

        Test participants: 7 college undergraduates, 4 graduate students, 3 faculty

      • Northern Illinois University, and The University of Illinois, Springfield, July, 2009
        WorldCat Local Usability Evaluation
      • Assessment goals: Validate recent changes to Item Details pages; explore proposed designs for further changes for metasearch and alternative ways of presenting local, group and global scope in search results.

        Issues to investigate included: Do participants succeed with redesigned controls for getting items from the local, group (I-Share), and global collections? Do participants succeed with revised paths for electronic access to licensed resources? What are participant reactions to changed arrangement of the most important bibliographic details, placement of information about contents and reviews, and paths to help and local library accounts?

        Test participants: 6 college undergraduates, 5 graduate students.

      • The University of California, San Francisco and The University of California Santa Barbara, November, 2009
        WorldCat Local at the University of California: Usability Testing, Round Two
      • Assessment goals: Validate recent changes to WorldCat Local made in response to earlier rounds of testing at UC and elsewhere. Evaluate the recently introduced UC Request feature. Track participant performance and preferences on issues that are part of ongoing Next Generation Melvyl assessment. Explore prototypes for new features.

        Issues to investigate included: How do participants perform with revised designs for item details pages, revised treatment of links to electronic resources, and repositioned controls for getting print items? How do participants perform when searching with journal titles, generic ones in particular; with previous titles for journals; for specific forms or genres; and searching with call numbers? Can participants identify items in a series? Do participants get the editions that they prefer? Do participants use facets? What expectations and preferences do participants have for the order of values within facets? How do participants prefer to navigate between search results lists and item details pages? How do participants prefer to manage citations? How do participants respond to proposed designs for showing availability and fulfillment from multiple ILS systems at the primary institution? For showing a fourth level of scope—in this case, California Libraries—in addition to local, group, and global holdings? To redesigned item details pages and search results with tabs for local, group, statewide, and worldwide scope?

        Test participants: 8 graduate students, 3 faculty, 1 research staff member.

      • University of Washington, July, 2010
        Metasearch Enhancements
      • Assessment goals: Evaluate working prototypes for metasearch enhancements and direct links to electronic items from brief search results.

        Issues to investigate included: Are participants aware of databases available to them? Are participants able to change which databases are searched? How do check boxes affect participants' use of facets?

        How successful are participants with a proposed design for links to electronic items from brief search results? How successful are participants with proposed redesign of controls for revising a search or starting a new search? How successful are participants with a journal facet? How do participants respond when a challenge for authentication comes after they have seen some search results, rather than before?

        Test participants: 3 college undergraduates, 2 graduate students

      • The Ohio State University, September, 2010
        WorldCat Local Usability Assessment
      • Assessment goals: Evaluate revised and proposed designs for Metasearch and links to full text.

        Test participants: 3 college undergraduates, 4 graduate students

      • Remote automated test with Usabilla, April, 2011
        WorldCat Local Online Usability Assessment
      • Assessment goals: Determine which of several proposed designs for icons and language best communicate the concepts of immediate access and full text. Assess perceptions of relevancy ranking.

        Test participants: 150 library staff and college and university students

      More information on these usability tests is posted. More information about OCLC’s testing in general is also available.



    Last updated: May 23, 2014